Scientists have made a discovery about the Great Pyramid of Giza which could help boost renewable energy in the current day. Picture: Supplied
Scientists have made a discovery about the Great Pyramid of Giza which could help boost renewable energy in the current day. Picture: Supplied

Pyramid’s secret could help us today

SCIENTISTS have made an incredible discovery about the 4000-year-old Great Pyramid of Giza which could help boost renewable energy in the current day.

Scientists from Russia have discovered that Egypt's largest pyramid can trap electric and magnetic energy into its chambers to spark higher levels of energy.

Researchers from ITMO University in Russia and the Laser Zentrum Hannover found that the 150-metre structure is capable of creating pockets of higher energy in its inner rooms and at its base, reports The Sun.

The research group plans to use the results to design nanoparticles, which will be used to develop sensors and highly efficient solar cells, reports The Journal of Applied Physics.

Dr Andrey Evlyukhin, scientific supervisor and co-ordinator of the study, said: "Egyptian pyramids have always attracted great attention.

"We as scientists were interested in them as well, so we decided to look at the Great Pyramid as a particle dissipating radio waves resonantly.

More than 4000 years after they were built, the Pyramids are still helping us today. Picture: AP
More than 4000 years after they were built, the Pyramids are still helping us today. Picture: AP

"Due to the lack of information about the physical properties of the pyramid, we had to use some assumptions.

"For example, we assumed that there are no unknown cavities inside, and the building material with the properties of an ordinary limestone is evenly distributed in and out of the pyramid.

"With these assumptions made, we obtained interesting results that can find important practical applications."

Scientists also found a hidden chamber in Egypt's Great Pyramid of Giza in 2017. Picture: Supplied
Scientists also found a hidden chamber in Egypt's Great Pyramid of Giza in 2017. Picture: Supplied

Researchers modelled the distribution of electromagnetic fields inside the pyramid while studying the interactions of electrical waves.

Scientists have deduced that the pyramid concentrates this electromagnetic energy in its hidden chambers, which includes rooms containing the remains of Pharoah Khufu and his wife.

There is also a third, unfinished chamber beneath the base of the huge structure.

And the team's analysis shows that the powerful pyramid concentrates electromagnetic energy in its internal chambers.

These hidden rooms include the chamber holding the mummified body of Pharaoh Khufu - who the iconic monument was built for - and another built for his wife.

The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza pyramid complex bordering what is now El Giza, Egypt. Picture: iStock
The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza pyramid complex bordering what is now El Giza, Egypt. Picture: iStock

But scientists believe the unusual discovery about the electromagnetic energy in the pyramid are just a coincidence.

They believe it is highly unlikely Ancient Egyptians knew anything about the science behind it and would not have built it in this way deliberately.

The pyramid took 20 years to build using around 100,000 slaves.

Scientists now plan to use the incredible discovery on a much smaller scale, which could create effective solar cells.

The higher energy can be used to develop extremely sensitive solar cells or even tiny sensors.

This article originally appeared in The Sun and is republished here with permission.



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