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Google Earth releases flood map

Google Earth images taken on January 29 at the height of the Bundaberg floods. This image shows the Burnett River and the bridges. Photo Google Earth
Google Earth images taken on January 29 at the height of the Bundaberg floods. This image shows the Burnett River and the bridges. Photo Google Earth Contributed

GOOGLE Earth have released satellite imagery of the Bundaberg region, pre, during and post floods.

>> Click here for a step by step guide to checking out floods on Google maps

Division 5 councillor Greg Barnes said he was quite surprised by the images.

"Until I flicked from one to the other, I didn't realise the extent of it all - it was phenomenal," Cr Barnes said.

"I was quite surprised, I've seen a lot of still images, the beauty of the images put out by Google is you can flick between dates and get a real sense of the devastation."

"You can see the velocity of the water in North, the house that got shifted and the extent right across the region," he said.

Cr Barnes said while the council had their own flood maps - not for public - Google was free of charge.

"They give you a fine feeling of what happened," he said.

"I think it would be of real interest to people to see what the extent was."

Bundaberg Mayor Mal Forman said Google Earth would aid the council in their further planning and development of Bundaberg.

"They complement one another and we believe it could be part of the flood mapping we took at council," he said.

"It will allow people to see the reality and truth of the flood and see how extensive it was."

Topics:  floods 2013



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