MODIFIED FOOD: TechNyou outreach officer Jim Bell examines raspberry DNA at AgroTrend.
MODIFIED FOOD: TechNyou outreach officer Jim Bell examines raspberry DNA at AgroTrend. Max Fleet

GM foods a hot topic at AgroTrend

THE long-standing issue of genetically modified (GM) foods is now on show at AgroTrend.

The topic has been a matter of contentious debate for nearly two decades.

A University of Melbourne academic funded by the Federal Government's TechNyou program is at the show to talk GM.

TechNyou outreach officer Jim Bell hopes to chat with as many people and "dispel myths" about genetic modification.

"We want to think they're not going away with a polarised view and are willing to talk about it," he said.

Mr Bell said it was important to critically analyse the topic and not just take information at face value.

"We want to get people engaged about genetically modified crops and see how they feel about them," he said.

"Genetic modification is one solution that we're putting forward, but not just one thing will guarantee food security."

He believed people often had a polarised view possibly due to a lack of information.

"It's all about critical thinking. We want to know, 'how did they arrive at that particular conclusion'," he said.

Mr Bell said most people didn't know how food was made.

"It's important to get people to think about where food comes from."

The TechNyou outreach officer visited North Bundaberg High School students on Wednesday.

He encouraged students, farmers, producers and the Bundaberg community to head to AgroTrend and discuss the matter of GM.

"The topic too often becomes polarised; we just want people to be able to have a conversation about it," he said.



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