The court heard McCarron was “caught up in the gangster rap culture” at the time of the break in.
The court heard McCarron was “caught up in the gangster rap culture” at the time of the break in.

‘GANGSTER CULTURE’: Man films rap video in Gin Gin break-in

A court has heard how a young man ran from the law in fear of the consequences he would face after being caught up in "gangster culture".

Damien Joel McCarron, 20, appeared in Bundaberg Magistrates Court on Monday by videolink from the Bundaberg Watch House.

He pleaded guilty to seven offences which included entering a premises and committing an indictable offence by break, possessing a knife in a public place and failing to appear.

The court heard McCarron and some co-accused people broke into the squash courts at the rear of the Puma Service Station at Gin Gin between July and August 2019.

They gained entry by forcing open the front door.

Once inside they spray painted words and slogans on the walls causing extensive damage.

They then recorded a rap music video which was uploaded to Facebook and YouTube.

McCarron was later identified as one of the people involved and was later spoken to by police where he made admissions.

McCarron then failed to appear in court three times following that offence with warrants issued for his arrest.

In the early hours of Sunday morning McCarron was spotted walking along Takalvan St by police as they were doing patrols in the area.

McCarron told police he did not know there was a warrant out for him but recalled he hadn't returned to a court matter as he had been in New South Wales.

Police searched McCarron and found a black hunting knife in a sheath and a plastic water pipe.

McCarron told officers he found the knife while walking and kept it to protect himself as he was homeless.

Police prosecutor Sergeant Grant Klaassen told the court McCarron had a limited history and that he had no previous entries of drug offences or failing to appear.

Duty lawyer Matt Maloy told the court his client failed to appear because he "feared the consequences" of his offending.

Mr Maloy told the court at the time of the break-in McCarron was "caught up in the gangster rap culture" of rap music and decided "very foolishly" that it was a good idea to go and make the video.

He said McCarron now accepted it "wasn't a good idea at all".

Mr Maloy said his client had plans to move to Brisbane to live with a friend and accepted the potential dangers of possessing the knife.

Acting Magistrate John Milburn took into account McCarron's plea of guilty when sentencing.

Mr Milburn also took into account the pleas for some of McCarron's offences came at an early opportunity.

McCarron was ordered to complete 60 hours of community service and received a total of $1600 in fines.

He was also ordered to pay a further $1500 in restitution for the damage caused to the squash courts.

Convictions were recorded.

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