Game’s best NRL coach to share his secret to success in Bundy

CRAIG Bellamy forged his reputation as one of the greatest coaches in rugby league history through hard work and the methodical development of his team.

Bellamy’s natural ability to coach individual athletes to reach their full potential and coordinate teams to achieve success has seen the Melbourne Storm win two premierships and record the league’s best win rate since his arrival at the club in 2003.

Ahead of his visit to Bundaberg tomorrow, as guest speaker at the NewsMail’s Bundy Club event, the supercoach sat down to discuss the proudest moment of his career, how he gets the most out of his players and what led him to be in a league of his own.

Putting much of his success down to hard work, Bellamy said while he hadn’t done a whole heap of different things in his life, but whatever he did, he worked incredibly hard at.

“While I’m sure there are lots of people who are smarter than me about footy and life in general, I don’t think there would be anyone in my profession who would outwork me,” he said.

“The big thing for me is developing the relationships with the people you work with and doing the basics well.

“You have got to build the foundations. At the Storm we pride ourselves on doing the little things really well and if we can do that we will be hard to beat — that’s the foundations of my coaching methodology.” His first taste as a head coach in the NRL was 2002 when he led the ‘baby Broncos’ while Wayne Bennet focused on the Queensland Origin team.

He got the attention of Melbourne and they came knocking.

“I went to Brisbane as their performance coordinator where my main focus was on strength and conditioning,” he said.

“After I had the chance to coach the baby Broncos during Origin and we won the game I seemed to be the flavour of the month and there was a lot of talk about me being the next NRL coach.

“If Storm hadn’t had asked me I don’t know what I’d be doing now. It’s funny how life works, sometimes you need a bit of luck and a lot of hard work over a long time.”

Under Bellamy’s leadership the Melbourne Storm has won two premierships, three minor premierships and have the best win rate in the NRL.

His ability to get people to work together for a common goal has paved that way.

“One of my biggest jobs as the coach is to make sure everyone in my team knows what their role is, and I mean knows exactly what their role is,” he said.

“There can’t be any thoughts like, “I might have to do that” or “do I do that or somebody else got to do that?

“The next step is I make them believe that their role is the most important role on the team.

“If you get someone to believe that their job is the most important then they will take pride in that and then it flows on to the other players.

“Then it’s trying to convince them every week about how important their job in the team is.”

Despite his success, things haven’t always been smooth sailing so it might be surprising to know that Bellamy’s proudest moment came after the club’s darkest days.

“It was in 2011 after the club had gone through the salary cap saga,” he said.

“That was a horrendous year and for us to get through that after we lost half of our squad and then the next year we go on to win the minor premiership was surreal.

“We didn’t win the grand final, but I couldn’t have been prouder of the team than I was that year.”

Bellamy’s natural ability to coach individual athletes to reach their full potential and coordinate teams to achieve success has seen the Melbourne Storm win two premierships and record the league’s best win rate since his arrival at the club in 2003.

Ahead of his visit to Bundaberg today, as guest speaker at the NewsMail’s Bundy Club event, the supercoach sat down to discuss the proudest moment of his career, how he gets the most out of his players and what led him to be in a league of his own.

Putting much of his success down to hard work, Bellamy said while he hadn’t done a whole heap of different things in his life, but whatever he did, he worked incredibly hard at.

“While I’m sure there are lots of people who are smarter than me about footy and life in general, I don’t think there would be anyone in my profession who would outwork me,” he said.

“The big thing for me is developing the relationships with the people you work with and doing the basics well.

“You have got to build the foundations. At the Storm we pride ourselves on doing the little things really well and if we can do that we will be hard to beat — that’s the foundations of my coaching methodology.”

His first taste as a head coach in the NRL was 2002 when he led the ‘baby Broncos’ while Bennet focused on the Queensland Origin team.

He got the attention of Melbourne and they came knocking.

“I went to Brisbane as their performance coordinator where my main focus was on strength and conditioning.,” he said.

“After I had the chance to coach the baby Broncos during Origin and we won the game I seemed to be the flavour of the month and there was a lot of talk about me being the next NRL coach.

“If Storm hadn’t had asked me I don’t know what I’d be doing now. It’s funny how life works, sometimes you need a bit of luck and a lot hard work over a long time.”

Under Bellamy’s leadership the Melbourne Storm has won two premierships, three minor premierships and the best win rate in the NRL.

His ability to get people to work together for a common goal have paved that way.

“One of my biggest jobs as the coach is to make sure everyone in my team knows what their role is, and I mean knows exactly what their role is,” he said.

“There can’t be any thoughts like, “I might have to do that” or “do I do that or somebody else got to do that?”. The next step is I make them believe that their role is the most important role on the team.

“If you get someone to believe that their job is the most important then they will take pride in that and then it flows on to the other players.

“Then it’s trying to convince them every week about how important their job in the team is.”

Despite his success, things haven’t always been smooth sailing so it might be surprising to know that Bellamy’s proudest moment came after the club’s darkest days.

“It was in 2011 after the club had gone through the salary cap saga,” he said.

“That was a horrendous year and for us to get through that after we lost half of our squad and then the next year we go on to win the minor premiership was surreal.

“We didn’t win the grand final, but I couldn’t have been prouder of the team than I was that year.”



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