Apple Tree Creek family Hayden (front), Erin, Renee and Courtney Svendsen with neighbour Ross McLennan are fearful there will be more wild dog attacks in the Hamanns Road area.
Apple Tree Creek family Hayden (front), Erin, Renee and Courtney Svendsen with neighbour Ross McLennan are fearful there will be more wild dog attacks in the Hamanns Road area. GARY HUTCHISON

Families fear roaming dogs

RENEE Svendsen fears the next thing attacked by dogs roaming her street will be her three children.

Last month the Hamanns Road resident’s children woke up one morning and went to feed their pet goats, Jack and Jill.

“Erin said, ‘Jill’s not getting up’,” Mrs Svendsen said.

“(The goat) looked okay from the front and then we walked around and took a look at her from behind.”

The dogs had left a gaping hole in the pet goat’s hind quarters and Mrs Svendsen was left with little choice but to put her down.

The Apple Tree Creek resident said that on Friday morning when one of her daughters went to feed the animals she spotted an animal bigger than a fox chasing a wallaby through bushland.

“I have three children on the property and I’m worried that (the wild dogs) will get bored with the animals and attack the three children,” Mrs Svendsen said.

While neighbour Ross McLennan has not lost any stock, he said he had seen dingoes and a large black long-haired dog run through his property in the past couple of months.

“It was bigger than a German Sheperd,” Mr McLennan said.

“He was pretty fit because he was chasing a kangaroo across the paddock ... and boy was he fast.”

The Hamanns Road resident said not enough was being done to keep feral dogs and dingoes under control.

“I’d like to see a bounty put on the dingoes and wild dogs like they had when I was a kid.

“That’s why it was under control.”

Eureka farmer Barbara Vincent said wild dogs had been an ongoing issue in the area, dating back at least 10 years when she lost $16,300 worth of stock to dingoes.

“It is mainly because the dingoes and dogs follow the water tributaries down from the state forest and people have seen them running around,” she said.

Mrs Vincent said she had seen packs of up to 20 dingoes and packs of up to 30 crossbred dingoes.

She also suggested completing a controlled cull or reintroducing the scalp bounty.



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