BIG RELIEF: Bundy Juice operations manager Collin Mann, supervisor Luke Tibby, production member Henri Van Baast and manager Mark D'Silva.
BIG RELIEF: Bundy Juice operations manager Collin Mann, supervisor Luke Tibby, production member Henri Van Baast and manager Mark D'Silva. Mike Knott BUN300517JUICE3

End to squeeze on Bundy Juice in sight

IF YOU'RE craving a glass of Bundy Juice's orange juice, you won't have to much longer for your fix.

The national orange juice crisis hung businesses like Bundy Juice out to dry, but after six months of struggling to keep their orange juice on the shelves, things are looking up.

Bundy Juice manager Mark D'Silva said the drought took a huge toll but, with July the start of the orange season, they are ready to get back on track with their suppliers.

"It's a big relief, because for the last six months we've taken such a hit,” he said.

"We didn't even want to put a figure on it because it would be hard to look at it and say in the last sixth months we have taken a hammering.

"So we are not looking at what's happened, we are just looking to the future and hoping it will be better for us.”

"We normally start at six in the morning and finish at four o'clock, but we have been finishing at 11am, 11.30am because we don't have any juice.

"Our sales are down because it affects our most popular drink.”

BACK ON TRACK: Bundy Juice's Mark D'Silva and Collin Mann are looking forward to orange supplies returning to normal levels.
BACK ON TRACK: Bundy Juice's Mark D'Silva and Collin Mann are looking forward to orange supplies returning to normal levels. Mike Knott BUN300517JUICE1

Mr D'Silva said the crisis arose after majority of Australia's orange juice was exported overseas.

"Demand was so high, everyone was sending fruit across,” he said.

"But you can't blame the farmers for going where the money is - there will always be a demand for Australian products.

"I guess sometimes you have to weigh the options between demand and domestic consumption.”

Mr D'Silva said the company was getting small amounts from suppliers but it wasn't anywhere near their usual haul.

"Normally we would average at about 90,000L a fortnight and then 2000L a week and then we were lucky to get any,” he said.

"But I guess you can't control the weather and the market.

"We couldn't afford to get juice from anywhere else because it is expensive.”

Mr D'Silva said co-operation from employees during the crisis was second-to-none.

Bundy Juice operations manager Collin Mann said the cost of importing would have been unfair ton to consumers and keep prices stead had been reflected in customer loyalty.

"We've had a lot of phone calls recently from consumers as far away as Victoria who are trying to find out when our juice will be back in production, which is really comforting for us.

"A lot of the time if you can't supply, they will go to another store. We've got people waiting in the wings which is great.”

DRY SUPPLY

The orange shortage affected four of Bundy Juice's top sellers:

  • 100% Orange
  • Tropical Fruit
  • Orange and Mango
  • Pub Juice


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