Daylight has revealed the extent of destruction caused by a tsunami in Indonesia. Source:Twitter
Daylight has revealed the extent of destruction caused by a tsunami in Indonesia. Source:Twitter

Band washed away as tsunami death toll climbs

SHOCKING vision has emerged from Indonesia showing the moment a massive wall of water swept away a rock band while they performed on stage.

The group Seventeen was in the middle of a concert at a utility company's end-of-year celebrations when the five-metre tsunami hit.

At least 168 people have been killed and another 745 injured, with widespread destruction across the Sunda Strait region.

Initial indications are that the tsunami was triggered by an undersea landslide, caused by the eruption of Krakatoa volcano late on Saturday night local time.

In videos shared on social media, Seventeen can be seen dancing around on a stage with a crowd of fans looking on, before the band and their equipment are washed away.

In a statement issued on behalf of the group, it was confirmed that their bassist and manager had been killed, and indicated others were missing.

According to The Times of India, about 250 employees of the company PLN were gathered near the beach at Tanjung Lesung, with the stage set up on the sand.

"The water washed away the stage … the water rose and dragged away everyone at the location," the statement said.

The official death toll sits at 168, with victims spread throughout the Pandeglang, South Lampung and Serang regions, but officials warn that number could rise as search and rescue operations expand.


Initial indications are that a five-metre wall of water washed at least 20 metres inland across the stretch of coast.

Daylight has revealed the extent of the destruction, including hundreds of significantly damaged homes and dozens of hotels and other buildings also impacted.

Indonesia's Disaster Mitigation Agency said several hundred people were injured and at least 30 are believed to be missing.

A tsunami has hit the Sunda Strait region of Indonesia.
A tsunami has hit the Sunda Strait region of Indonesia.

A spokesperson for the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said the Australian Embassy in Jakarta is making urgent inquiries to determine if any Australians were affected.

"We understand that at present there are no foreigners, let alone Australians, who have been impacted by this," Prime Minister Scott Morrison told reporters on Sunday.

"This comes on top of what had happened in Sulawesi and so as always, we're available to support the Indonesian government with these things, as requested.

"There have been no such requests. I'm not anticipating any on this occasion. But should they present, then obviously we will work with the Indonesian government as they request."

Daylight has revealed the extent of the destruction, with hundreds of significantly damaged homes and dozens of hotels and other buildings also impacted.

On Twitter, the boss of the agency, Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, apologised and said the incorrect initial information was based on available data.

"The initial error occurred because of referring data and information from various sources that there was no tsunami," a translation of the message read.

"There was no earthquake that triggered the tsunami at that time. That is the difficulty in determining the cause of the tsunami at the beginning of the incident."

Rescue crews are heading to the area to assist locals.

PEOPLE RAN FOR HIGH GROUND

Vision shared on social media shows locals running in fear as a wall of water swamps the coastline, inundating restaurants and hotels.

"I had to run, as the wave passed the beach and landed 15-20m (meters) inland," Oystein Lund Andersen wrote on Facebook.

He said he was taking pictures of the volcano when he suddenly saw a big wave coming towards him.

"Next wave entered the hotel area where I was staying and downed cars on the road behind it. Managed to evacuate with my family to higher ground trough forest paths and villages, where we are taken care of (by) the locals. Were unharmed, thankfully."

In an interview with BBC World News, Mr Anderson said he saw two waves - one smaller one, followed by a much larger wave - smash into the coast.

"I ran straight to the hotel, where my wife and my son were sleeping," he said.

"And I woke them up … and I heard a bigger wave coming. I looked out of the window when the second wave hit. It was much bigger.

"The wave passed the hotel. Cars were pushed off the road. We and other people at the hotel went straight to the forest (on higher ground) next to the hotel. And we're still up on the hill now."

TSUNAMI INVOKES PAST FEARS

In September, an estimated 2000 people were killed by a quake and tsunami that hit the city of Palu on the island of Sulawesi.

On Boxing Day in 2004, a massive earthquake in the Indian Ocean triggered a number of tsunami waves that killed an estimated 228,000 across 14 countries.

With wires

Vision shows a tsunami swamping the Indonesian coastline.
Vision shows a tsunami swamping the Indonesian coastline.
Vision shows a tsunami swamping the Indonesian coastline.
Vision shows a tsunami swamping the Indonesian coastline.
Social media vision shows cars strewn after the tsunami.
Social media vision shows cars strewn after the tsunami.


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