South Isis farmer Brett Wright and the runaway pooch George, who turned up on the streets of Gladstone a month after going missing from the family farm.
South Isis farmer Brett Wright and the runaway pooch George, who turned up on the streets of Gladstone a month after going missing from the family farm.

Dog returned after 220km adventure

IT was a happy reunion when Brett Wright was reunited with his dog, George, after the pooch was found more than 220km from home four weeks after going missing.

When George, a lhasa apso, did not return to the South Isis farm after playing at the cattle yards, Mr Wright and his family had assumed the pup had been bitten by a brown snake.

“I was really surprised when I got the call from Gladstone Regional Council saying George was there,” Mr Wright said.

The wandering canine was found in the Gladstone streets by a resident on November 6 and, thanks to a microchip, was able to be returned to the Wrights.

“They rang on Monday and I was able to go pick him up on Tuesday,” Mr Wright said.

Mr Wright said he was not the only one “over the moon” about the reunion.

“He’s a beautiful dog and he was beside himself when I called his name when I went to pick him up,” Mr Wright said.

Mr Wright said he was thankful George, whom the family had got from the Bundaberg RSPCA shelter about two years ago, had a chip in place.

Bundaberg RSPCA Shelter manager Vicki Beer said cases like George went to show how important microchipping a pet was.

“It’s so good when they are chipped. We get so excited when they come through and have a microchip,” she said.

Once the chip is detected in the dog, it is simply a case of putting the chip’s details into the website in order to contact the owner.

Mrs Beer said every animal that came through the centre was scanned for a microchip but ensuring the safe return of a pet did not end once the chip was in place.

“If they keep their details in relation to the chip up-to-date then they are laughing,” she said.

Mrs Beer said microchipping an animal was inexpensive and could be done at the vets.

Gladstone Regional Council local law enforcement officer Julie Nash said microchips were preferable for the sake of pets, owners, the RSPCA and the council, because they could not fall off like a tag.

“In George’s case we may never know what caused him to be missing, or how he came to be in Gladstone, but we do know that council officers would not have been able to reunite him with his family if he had not been implanted with a microchip,” she said.



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