GUILTY: Kimberley John Jenkinson, 47, has pleaded guilty to possessing and searching for child exploitation material.
GUILTY: Kimberley John Jenkinson, 47, has pleaded guilty to possessing and searching for child exploitation material. Facebook

'DISGUSTING': CBD worker caught with 450,000 child porn pics

POLICE conducting a house search have barged in on a former Dymocks employee scrolling through the internet, searching for fresh child porn to add to his colossal stash of child exploitation materials.

Yesterday the Bundaberg District Court heard Kimberley John Jenkinson, 47, plead guilty to possessing more than 456,000 images and videos of child exploitation material, and using the internet to access child pornography.

During a police search on April 24, officers walked in on Jenkinson in his home as he looked at some of the child exploitation material he had already downloaded, while searching for more online.

As they entered, police saw a webpage open on the man's screen, with multiple images of child exploitation material on display.

The hundreds-of-thousands of disturbing images and videos were found spread across numerous devices including a Samsung tablet, a desktop computer, a hard drive and a USB.

Almost all featured pre-pubescent girls.

Two binders of hard copies of images were also found hidden underneath Jenkinson's bed.

"The images show a gross and disgusting exploitation of young children," Judge Katherine McGinness said during sentencing.

The court heard Jenkinson had no prior criminal history, no wife and no children.

Defence barrister Nick Larter said his client had been consistently employed for the past 13 years, since moving to Bundaberg from Perth.

In that time he has held jobs at Dymocks Bundaberg and Dick Smith.

Mr Larter added his client had been a blood and plasma donor for the past decade and consistently gave money to charities as well.

Crown prosecutor Elizabeth Kelso pointed out Jenkinson's early plea of guilty, cooperation, and full and open admissions to police.

"He spoke to police and freely admitted that he had been attracted to girls in that age bracket (12-year-olds) for a very long period, he estimated 10 years, and that he had accessed those images daily," she said.

"The real issue, and the real aggravating issue for Mr Jenkinson of course, is that overwhelming figure in terms of the videos and images he collected."

Ms Kelso presented two references from the Court of Appeal before Judge McGinness, with each precedent discussing the extensive number of images possessed by each man.

Both in The Queen v Dundas [2017] and The Queen v Davis [2012] the defendants were sentenced for possessing 36,711 images and 523 videos and 49,817 images and 305 videos respectively.

"Each of those men have effectively a tenth of the amount of images for which Mr Jenkinson comes to be sentenced"

In 2017, Dundas was sentenced to two years imprisonment, to be suspended after serving six months in custody. Davis (in 2012) was sentenced to four years imprisonment suspended after 16 months.

But despite the astonishing amount of child exploitation material police found at Jenkinson's home, his defence argued the total was more than likely made up of duplicate files.

Mr Larter added the materials police found in his client's possession were mostly of a much less serious nature than those of Dundas and Davis.

In response, Judge McGinness said while most were in Category 1 (the least serious category for these materials) there were still "a number of images in Categories 2-4 and 6, there are also 6 videos in Category 5, which is the most serious category".

"I have reached the conclusion that a sentence of imprisonment is the only appropriate sentence," she said.

"This is not a victimless crime and it is necessary to impose a sentence that will hopefully stop others in the future from committing such serious offences."

Jenkinson was sentenced to 18 months in prison for using the internet to access child porn and three years for possessing child exploitation material.

After serving 10 months behind bars, he will be released on 12 months probation and a $2000 recognisance, on the condition he remain on good behaviour for the next two years.