Council staff manoeuvre a concrete block into place to stop salt water infiltration during a previous event – a difficult task.
Council staff manoeuvre a concrete block into place to stop salt water infiltration during a previous event – a difficult task.

Awesome sights as Bray Park Weir overflows

BRAY Park Weir was a sight to behold in the early hours of Monday.

Tides that were 320mm higher than predicted dumped 15ML of salt water into the weir pool for the Tweed district's water supply, causing a sea level anomaly.

A Tweed Shire Council spokesman said the salty water, that is heavier than freshwater, is contained in a deep depression of the weir pool and is not affecting the quality of the water supply.

The council is drawing its raw water from the top levels of the weir pool for treatment at Bray Park Water Treatment Plant.

The current run of sea level anomalies is predicted to peak today and begin to weaken later this week.

Then, more dangerously, monthly high tides are predicted for the week from June 3 to June 9.

Council staff manoeuvre a concrete block into place to stop salt water infiltration during a previous event – a difficult task.
Council staff manoeuvre a concrete block into place to stop salt water infiltration during a previous event – a difficult task.

Water and Wastewater Business and Assets manager Anthony Burnham said Monday's overtopping event highlights the significant risk in managing the weir using current business-as-usual approaches and modelling forecasts.

"By late Sunday when we knew the tides would be much higher than predicted, it was too late and too dangerous to ask our workers to place the blocks on the weir," he said.

The council has been working with a community-based Project Reference Group (PRG) to identify a solution to the problem since a major overtopping event shut down the production of water for two days in August 2017.

Last Thursday, the council deferred discussions on the PRG's recommended solution. It will now continue discussions at a workshop next month.

"The deferral of a decision and the need for councillors to further discuss and understand this issue highlights how complex it is," Mr Burnham said.

"We look forward to next month's workshop as Monday's incident and the ongoing risk for the next few weeks again reinforces that we need to find a better way to mitigate this tidal inundation risk and manage our water supply for the future."

For more information and background about the Bray Park Weir project visit https://www.yoursaytweed.com.au/BrayParkWeir



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