FIRED UP: A yellow vest protester demonstrates in Saint Jean De Luz, France, on Saturday. Yellow vest protesters are planning rallies in several French cities despite a national debate launched this week by President Emmanuel Macron aimed at assuaging their anger.
FIRED UP: A yellow vest protester demonstrates in Saint Jean De Luz, France, on Saturday. Yellow vest protesters are planning rallies in several French cities despite a national debate launched this week by President Emmanuel Macron aimed at assuaging their anger. Bob Edme

DEMAND FOR CHANGE: Yellow vests march in Bundy

A CONTROVERSIAL protest group whose peaceful march led to violent outrage across France has had brothers and sisters in arms rise up in Bundaberg.

While the yellow vests movement, or Mouvement des gilets jaunes, hit the streets of Paris for it's tenth weekend fighting for change against the French government, Bundaberg locals held a march of their own on Saturday.

Donning fluorescent jackets, between 20 to 25 concerned Rum City residents gathered at Anzac Park for a non-destructive event to call for a Citizens Initiated Referendum (CIR).

Defined on the event's Facebook page, the activists want to see a push for the government to become an "honest and accountable form of democracy” achieved through the CIR, an action which would enable Australian citizens to initiate the process of holding a referendum to alter the constitution.

Although the original movement has led to chaos overseas, Member for Burnett Stephen Bennett said he welcomed civil demonstrations from the public in his electorate.

"Peaceful engagement is encouraged and continues to be part of our democracy,” he said.

"I will always encourage people to get involved in the political process and people need to engage more on policy with their political representatives.”

He said his "doors are always open to meetings with residents to discuss plans to better the region” and he would always demand to be heard on behalf of the people.

The yellow vests movement began on November 17, with residents of France wanting demands met, including a decrease of fuel and motor taxes, an improved standard of living, a boosting of the minimum wage, and the resignation of current President Emmanuel Macron, to name a few.

"Importantly we know the Yellow Vest example in France shows that socialism and Labor Governments don't work,” Mr Bennett said.

The Bundaberg event was one of multiple rallies across Australia over the weekend, with organiser for the Yellow Vests Australia groups Phillip Watt urging that one of the values for members was creating a peaceful movement with the aim to identify and rectify core flaws within the system.

The NewsMail made unsuccessful attempts to contact members of the local yellow vests movement.

Yellow vests were chosen as the symbol for the movement as French motorists must have one in their vehicle at all times for safety in case of a break down.



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