Stewart Law is planning a fun ride from Perth to Alice Springs in April which will take about a month over dirt roads.
Stewart Law is planning a fun ride from Perth to Alice Springs in April which will take about a month over dirt roads. RON BURGIN

Cyclist plans marathon ride

THE lure of the open road will see Moore Park resident Stewart Law setting out on a 2500km cycling marathon next year.

Mr Law plans to spend almost a month cycling from Perth to Alice Springs with a group of fellow bicycling enthusiasts.

But the 64-year-old admits he has some work to do before setting out on the big ride on April 10 next year.

“I haven’t done a lot of training, but I’m going to have to start going out on 30km to 40km rides,” he said.

Mr Law said the Perth to Alice Springs trip was organised by a private company that specialised in setting up bicycle tours.

“They organise back-up vehicles and people and provide the food,” he said.

“But at the end of every stage you have to get your tent off the back of the truck and pitch it yourself, then fold it up in the morning.”

The ride will be just that little bit more gruelling because the group will only be on bitumen roads at the beginning and end of the route.

“Most of it will be on dirt so I’ll have to take the mountain bike,” Mr Law said.

“Taking a road bike out on 100km of bitumen is one thing, but riding a mountain bike on 100km of dirt is something else altogether.”

Mr Law is no stranger to distance riding.

He is a member of the Mad Cycologists group that meets for a social ride in Bundaberg on Sunday mornings, and some years ago did a trip from Port Augusta up the Birdsville track.

“That was fantastic, and I lost a lot of weight,” he said.

“There were 17 in that group, and most of us just rode along at our own pace and had a chat.

“It’s a great way to see the country.”

What will add a special flavour to this latest trip is that 17 years ago Mr Law was given just weeks to live by medical specialists.

Back in 1992, Mr Law was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

“I was pretty crook, but after nine months of chemotherapy I came good,” he said.

But that brush with death made him re-evaluate his life.

“I was basically working two full-time jobs and pushing myself and then suddenly I found myself in hospital not looking to survive,” he said.

Mr Law and his wife were living in Darwin at the time.

“Moore Park had always been a favourite holiday spot so we retired down here,” he said.



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