Paramedics Lauren Jackson and Mick Gray take Bundaberg State High School student Stacey Cooper away as part of a re-enactment held at the school.
Paramedics Lauren Jackson and Mick Gray take Bundaberg State High School student Stacey Cooper away as part of a re-enactment held at the school. Max Fleet

Crash wake-up call to kids

ASHLEIGH Grambower was horrified when she saw a wrecked car and the lifeless body of her classmate, Ely Marsland.

“It really hits you, when it's someone you know,” the Bundaberg North State High student said.

“It was a bit scary, seeing how all the people started blaming each other (for his death).”

But unlike most people who are pronounced dead at the scene of a traffic crash, Ely was able to walk away afterwards — along with his fellow actors.

He and three other students took part in a docudrama designed to show students a realistic simulation of a car crash, at Bundaberg North State High School yesterday.

“When you heard the (ambulance) sirens, it felt so real,” said Emma Maughan, who played the drunk driver.

“I rushed out to Ely and started screaming his name, and I could see all the audiences' faces drop.”

Paramedics and ambulance officers, police, undertakers and a lawyer were on hand to explain their role in the aftermath of a serious crash.

“It hurts, get me out of here,” wailed actor Luke Samuels, while a paramedic spoke about the type of injuries commonly seen in crash victims.

Solicitor Edmond D'Albret, from Payne Butler Lang Solicitors, spoke about the legal impact of being at fault in a serious smash.

“You can be charged with dangerous driving causing death, or grievous bodily harm, and if found guilty, you could face up to 10 years' imprisonment,” he said.

“The civil consequences can also be financially devastating. If you are found to be drink-driving, compulsory third-party insurance does not apply and you could be personally liable (for all medical costs).”

Crash survivor Kevin Delaney also shared his experiences, after a speeding driver slammed into his bicycle eight years ago.

“I had 100 broken bones, I lost a quarter of my brain and 37 years of my life — I can't remember getting married, or fathering my two kids. I will have to live with (the consequences) for the rest of my life — and so will the driver.”

Docudrama program educator Barry Collis said seeing fellow students in the re-enactment would help drive the message home.

“It makes it more credible, when they can see that it really could be someone they know,” he said.



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