RSPCA regional inspector Amanda Yates with Sarge and Fred who need a home.
RSPCA regional inspector Amanda Yates with Sarge and Fred who need a home. Mike Knott

Compulsory desexing call

BUNDABERG'S RSPCA has urged people to desex their pets after the shelter was forced to send some puppies to Noosa due to an influx locally.

RSPCA inspector Amanda Yates said overpopulation of kittens and puppies could easily be avoided if there was compulsory desexing, something for which she planned to lobby. Ms Yates's warning comes as many litters are soon to be born in spring and summer.

“If there was compulsory desexing, overpopulation would not be an issue,” she said.

“With thousands of kittens and puppies, we would love it to be regulated. We would have a huge reduction in unwanted litters.”

Ms Yates is also encouraging people to consider adopting from the Bundaberg centre rather than buying a new pet from an unregistered breeder.

She said all pets at the centre were desexed, vaccinated, wormed and had had health checks before being adopted out to new homes.

The inspector said the spring season was sparked last week when the Bundaberg shelter had an influx of puppies.

“We had to send some to Noosa because there were so many,” she said.

Ms Yates has also warned people not to dump animals, but instead to drop them off at the RSPCA shelter in Doblo Street.

“Bring them to us,” she said.

“We will look after them.

"We will definitely keep them as long as they need to be kept.”



'Something has to be done' about feral pigs

'Something has to be done' about feral pigs

Landowners are searching for answers to the feral pig problem.

BLIND JUSTICE: Bundy MP's petition for disability parking

premium_icon BLIND JUSTICE: Bundy MP's petition for disability parking

Vision impaired Queenslanders can't obtain disability parking permit

Local Partners