Captions key to better learning

ONE in every three Australian schoolchildren could be missing out at school because they cannot clearly hear or understand videos shown in class.

Launching the national Cap That campaign, Media Access Australia CEO Alex Varley said captions were a free and easy way to improve learning and literacy for 1.4 million students Australia-wide."But they are also extremely helpful for the growing number of kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders, ADHD, dyslexia or other learning disabilities," Mr Varley said.

"Obviously captions are essential for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

"Reinforcing what's heard and seen with captioning helps students focus and engage with what they are watching, which means they learn more."

Mr Varley said research showed captioning could boost literacy for all students.

Captions are now widely available and eachers and principals can download free resources for the classroom from http://www.capthat.com.au.



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