Dog obedience trainer Vivian Smith believes menacing dog numbers would be lower if owners put their animals through obedience training.
Dog obedience trainer Vivian Smith believes menacing dog numbers would be lower if owners put their animals through obedience training. Max Fleet

Bundy tops list of menace dogs

BUNDABERG is leading the charge against violent dogs with 46 out of Queensland’s 110 menacing animals registered in the area.

The list, which includes chihuahuas, a toy poodle and a pomeranian, began in July this year and numbers are still on the rise with several animals going through the declaration process.

Bundaberg Regional Councillor Mary Wilkinson said she believed the high number came down to council following through on complaints.

“People complain and we act on it,” she said.

By law, all regulated dogs must have been microchipped, wear an identification tag, be kept in a prescribed enclosure with a set sign displayed, be muzzled in public and be desexed.

To qualify for the list, animals must have acted in a way that caused fear to a person or another animal.

This can include anything from rushing at someone on the other side of a fence to physical attacks.

Leading Bundaberg’s menacing list are seven Staffordshire bull terriers, followed by six ridgebacks and six mastiffs.

Boxers, border collies, labradors, cattle dogs, maltese and huskies also made the list.

While Bundaberg is obviously cracking down on the menacing animals, 18 councils across the state are yet to register even one dog on the list.

Cr Wilkinson said the registration was a positive use of council resources.

“It’s part of council’s role to keep everyone safe,” she said. “If something happened, people would want us to act upon it so we are doing it from the get go.”

Obedience Dog Club of Bundaberg chief instructor Vivian Smith said the problem was not the dogs, it was the owners.

“Some people can turn even the most lovable dogs into vicious dogs,” she said. “Every dog has a different personality even within the breeds.”

Mrs Smith said she felt for dogs with a bad reputation such as pitbulls and staffies.

“Some of those dogs have lovely temperaments,” she said.

“The owners are the ones who make them bad.”

The dog trainer of about 35 years said violent dogs were no accident – they were created by “mongrel owners”.

“You need to treat your dog with consistency and kindness and respect,” she said.

“You should never hit a dog. They need to be taught right from wrong with praise.”



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