CREEPY CRAWLY: Mitch Galikanokus came across this wolf spider in his front yard at the Hummock.
CREEPY CRAWLY: Mitch Galikanokus came across this wolf spider in his front yard at the Hummock.

Bundy man discovers what lurks wolfishly below

MITCH Galikanokus was on his front lawn training his dog when he came upon another animal that took him by surprise.

"I've just got a new puppy and we're training her before we go back to work to be on her own,” the Hummock resident said.

"I bailed out the front and was hiding from her, lying on the lawn, when I found the hole.”

The critter in the hole, pictured left - hiding in a burrow "about the size of a five cent piece” on Mr Galikanokus' fence line - is a wolf spider, according to Queensland Museum arachnologist Robert Raven.

According to the Museum, there are around 200 species of wolf spiders in Australia.

They are "voracious hunters and will take diverse prey that comes before them”.

The creepy crawlies are useful as they keep such unwanted visitors as lawn grubs and other larval insects at bay.

But they should not be handled as their bite can cause painful infections in humans and kill dogs and cats in under an hour.

Luckily for Mr Galikanokus, who captured the shot on his iPhone, "It was more scared of me than I was of it.”



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