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Bundy indie musos strike a chord on music scene

SOUND CHECK: Bundaberg musicians Ryan King, Ethan Greaves and Stuart McKenzie are following their musical dream in Brisbane as the band Jouk Mistrow. Photo: contributed
SOUND CHECK: Bundaberg musicians Ryan King, Ethan Greaves and Stuart McKenzie are following their musical dream in Brisbane as the band Jouk Mistrow. Photo: contributed contributed

WITH raw unbridled enthusiasm and a unique sound, a trio of Bundaberg musicians are establishing themselves in the competitive indie music scene in Brisbane.

Ethan Greaves, Stuart Mckenzie and Rian King formed the band Jouk Mistrow - then known as Rabbit - in Bundaberg early last year before moving to Brisbane to pursue their musical ambitions.

The band's latest Ep Did We? was released in March and has garnered attention from across the world.

"We have had attention from German music blogs and interest from the UK, America and Zimbabwe," Greaves said.

"We have been invited to play an indite garage festival in the UK which we unfortunately can't make.

"It is really cool thing to have a song you wrote when you were 17 in high school get interest."

Greaves said after finishing school at Bundaberg State High School, the band moved to Brisbane last year to study and reach a wider audience.

The 19-year-old singer, who is studying at Queensland Conservatorium at Griffiths University, described the band's music as "pseudo-nihilistic alternative garage" and inspired by groups such as Interpol and Arctic Monkeys.

"We really sound like ourselves more than any of those other artists however and aim to be original in our music," he said.

In May the band took out popular Brisbane contest Ric's Bar Exposed Competition - a massive 13-week battle of the bands with more than 55 high-profile entrants.

One of the organisers of that competition Chad St James said Jouk Mistrow stood out from the pack with its energetic performances.

"Their music is quite catchy and different from a lot of the music you get around here," he said.

"You know performance wise they are going to get better."

As the band prepares to launch a second EP and an east coast tour later this year supporting among others DZ Deathrays Greaves said he had learnt a lot about the music industry in the past 18 months.

"The biggest thing I've learnt is believe in the original idea. That will give you perspective," he said.

"And don't rush to the finish line. If you have a great song you need to take your time and get everything you can out of it."

To follow the band's journey visit its Facebook page at www.facebook.com/joukmistrow.

Topics:  entertainment music pulse



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