GLAMOUR: Fashion student Tiarnie Gilbert said she would have taken courses in Bundaberg if they were available sooner.
GLAMOUR: Fashion student Tiarnie Gilbert said she would have taken courses in Bundaberg if they were available sooner. CONTIBUTED

Bundy fashion lovers can now study the art

FASHION is a complex and multi-dimensional topic, and TAFE Queensland has announced it will now offer courses in the diverse subject at its Bundaberg location.

The Certificate II in Applied Fashion Design and Technology and Certificate III in Visual Arts will begin this month, with the part-time courses aimed to help students develop their creativity and hone their skills to make high quality creations.

Creative and digital centre director Angela Lisle said she was excited to see local talent uncovered as a result of the courses.

GLAMOUR: Fashion student Tiarnie Gilbert said she would have taken courses in Bundaberg if they were available sooner.
GLAMOUR: Fashion student Tiarnie Gilbert said she would have taken courses in Bundaberg if they were available sooner. CONTIBUTED

"This is the first time we've offered either of these courses in Bundaberg in quite some time, so there is sure to be plenty of untapped potential out there,” Ms Lisle said.

Former Bundaberg resident turned fashion student Tiarnie Gilbert moved to Melbourne to study her passion and said an introductory course would have helped her find her niche sooner.

"I was always DIYing clothing and op-shopping to make my own things, even to the extent of styling my brothers,” Ms Gilbert said.

"I think if there was a course available locally I definitely would have been interested and my career probably would have started a lot sooner than it has.”

The Certificate III in Visual Art will see students refine their skills across a number of mediums including sculpture, ceramics, digital imaging, drawing and painting, while the Certificate II in Applied Fashion will teach students how to sew, design patterns, recognise and work with various fabrics, and create garments using industry-standard equipment.

"The industry is so broad, locally and internationally, that it definitely takes time to figure out which role in fashion you want,” Ms Gilbert said.

"Getting a head start at a young age is so advantageous for future studies and career prospects. There's a big difference between say, being a designer and working for a fashion company, and the earlier you find your passion, the earlier you can implement your plans to get there.”

The fashionista found the industry was very different to what's shown online or in magazines.

"I went into it thinking I wanted to be some crazy talented fashion designer and quickly realised the skills needed to make the clothing that you see on runways is far more intense than I imagined,” she said.

"I learned that my skills personally lay in styling and trend forecasting, rather than pattern making and designing, and sometimes I wish I knew that earlier.

"The other important thing I learned though is that you do need real knowledge of physically making garments and of fabric types in all areas of fashion because it comes up all the time.”

The course, which is open to all ages, is also covered under the Queensland Government's Vocational Education and Training in School funding, making it free for eligible high school students.

"This program is a particularly fantastic opportunity for high school students looking to get a head start in their career,” Ms Lisle said.

"These students receive skills and knowledge in their chosen industry while gaining points towards their QCE, which provides them with a clearer pathway into the industry.”



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