Britney’s latest videos spark concern

 

 

A fresh wave of concern for Britney Spears' welfare has circulated online after the star released another of her famed Instagram dancing videos.

Unlike the many quirky videos before it, which have been a source of light fun poked at the energetic pop megastar on social media, the latest upload has fans worried there's a sinister message behind it.

As the #FreeBritney hashtag trends again, Spears has treated her 25.2 million followers to a performance of her dancing to Rihanna's track Never Ending, writing in the caption: "I feel like I'm flying with this song."

The 38-year-old mum-of-two donned a white crop top and pyjama shorts in the video, as she improvised an elaborate dance routine full of wild hand gestures.

 

"Rihanna … … your music makes me FEEL like I've never felt before! 'Never Ending' is my favourite song off of the ANTI album … I feel like I'm flying with this song … thank you," the Toxic singer wrote.

Spears posted another performance to a Billie Eilish song, showcasing similar moves and writing: "I should (have) makeup on and brush my hair but I just wanna dance."

The dance clips come as claims about the star's legal and financial situation resurface online, with many fans suggesting strict arrangements put in place 12 years ago are exploiting the singer.

Others have pointed out that under her court-approved conservatorship, she's unable to speak up herself, and many are baffled by the fact that despite the order put in place following mental health struggles, she's been able to work consistently for years, even holding a Las Vegas club residency until December 31, 2017.

Spears' finances are under a court-approved conservatorship previously controlled by her father Jamie, 68, who made decisions about her money and life before he stepped away last September, citing health reasons.

And Britney's mother Lynn Spears has this week filed legal documents to ensure she is included on decisions regarding her daughter's finances, The Blast reports.

Yesterday, Spears' former photographer went viral via a series of videos on TikTok after reading a letter she allegedly wrote about her conservatorship, which described how she was supposedly manipulated into her divorce from Kevin Federline and into giving up custody of their two sons.

Britney Spears with sons, Jayden and Sean. Picture: Instagram
Britney Spears with sons, Jayden and Sean. Picture: Instagram

Andrew Gallery, who worked with Spears back in 2008, claimed the singer's original letter was taken and destroyed by conservators. But Gallery said he'd made a copy of it - which was shown several times throughout the videos.

"What happened to Britney was a year ago and people need to get with the times," Spears allegedly wrote in the third person.

"As for Kevin saying Britney divorced him, she was forced to by her lawyers because she went to visit him in New York and he wouldn't see her and the children and her lawyers said if she doesn't divorce him he's going to do it himself," the letter read.

"She was lied to and set up," the letter goes on.

"Her children were taken away and she did spin out of control which any mother would in those circumstances."

Talking about her conservatorship, the writer claimed Spears "has no rights".

The letter – which Gallery says is a copy of one Spears wrote – claims she has ‘no rights’. Picture: Instagram.
The letter – which Gallery says is a copy of one Spears wrote – claims she has ‘no rights’. Picture: Instagram.

In the comments on her latest Instagram activity, fans have speculated that the videos are a cry for help given she's so heavily restricted.

"I feel like there's a million signs here," one wrote.

"Has anyone noticed the same verified people are always commenting the same 'positive' things on her dancing videos," another pointed out.

"She's doing her own version of sign language. She's spelling out HELPPP ME," said another, while one told the singer: "Draw a black dot on your palm in your next post if your (sic) in trouble but can't say anything because they're listening."

As pointed out by a superfan on Twitter, in March, Spears' own son Sean Preston "liked" a post in support of the #freebritney campaign.

He went further in a major Instagram rant, calling his grandfather Jamie a "d**k" and revealing his troubled mum may "quit" music for good.

Her mother Lynne has also showed support for the movement, last year claiming the star's management team was trying to "keep up the illusion that she needs help" on her Instagram account.

According to Page Six, Lynne commented on a fan account: "They were all so quick to remove all comments before, but now all (of a) sudden they are leaving all negative ones, but removing positive ones! How much longer is this going to be? This has to be human rights violation! #FreeBritney#britneyspears."

Britney Spears with dad Jamie. Picture: Supplied
Britney Spears with dad Jamie. Picture: Supplied


The fan-driven movement calls for Britney to be "freed" from the conservatorship which controls many aspects of her day-to-day life.

A conservatorship is a legal concept in the US where a guardian is appointed to manage someone's financial affairs and daily life due to physical or mental restrictions.

Britney has been under a conservatorship for 12 years after she was admitted to a psychiatric hospital twice in 2008.

According to People, the singer's "care manager" Jodi Montgomery was appointed last year as temporary conservator at her father Jamie's request. He reportedly resumed the role again in January.

A Change.org petition called "Britney Spears: right to her own lawyer" has also been created. As of July 15, the petition has 171,936 signatures.

 

 

 

Originally published as Britney's latest videos spark concern



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