If you ever needed convincing that hope can be found in the worst of times, these two joey wombats are proof in pudding.
If you ever needed convincing that hope can be found in the worst of times, these two joey wombats are proof in pudding.

Baby wombats who beat the odds find love

Two orphaned baby wombats, saved from lonely roadside deaths by passing motorists, have found love, according to their carers.

Wombats Joey and Chrissy, both victims of car accidents which killed their mothers, have become inseparable after meeting at the home of western Sydney WIRES volunteer Robin Palmer.

Baby wombats Chrissy and Joey. Picture: Tim Hunter.
Baby wombats Chrissy and Joey. Picture: Tim Hunter.

 

Chrissy is fed. Picture: Tim Hunter
Chrissy is fed. Picture: Tim Hunter

"When I first got little Joe he was a little shy and timid so I was a little nervous how he might react to Chrissy," Ms Palmer said.

"However to my amazement they hit it off almost straight away and would never stay away from each other.

"Every morning when I would come into their bedroom, instead of being in their own beds, they would be cuddling up to each other or playing together. It's just so adorable."

The loved-up duo are now being raised on a larger property in the Southern Highlands by volunteer Noelene Bondfield.

The next year will see the marsupials, who are bottle fed a special formula about four times a day, learn how to survive in the wild.

"I will continue to feed and look after them over the coming months but after a while expect that they will be able to live on my property with minimal support," Ms Bondfield said. "Soon they will be wild animals again and will be able to transition to their 'forever home' and roam free like they are supposed to."

Baby kangaroo joey Lily. Picture: Tim Hunter
Baby kangaroo joey Lily. Picture: Tim Hunter

Ms Palmer has a new orphan in her care - Lily the pinky kangaroo.

The 300g joey survived 24 hours in her mother's pouch after she was killed by a car.

With hundreds of injured and abandoned native animals going into the care of WIRES every year, the organisation relies heavily on volunteers to ensure they get a second chance.

Baby kangaroo joey Lily.
Baby kangaroo joey Lily.

It's something that CEO Leonnie Taylor doesn't take for granted.

"It is thanks to Noelene and WIRES volunteers across NSW that thousands of native animals are rescued every year and given a second chance."

"Their care and dedication in rehabilitating injured, orphaned and displaced native wildlife and releasing them back into their natural habitat is invaluable and ultimately their rescue work ensures these species continue to thrive for future generations of Australians to enjoy."

Originally published as Baby wombats who beat the odds find love

Chrissy and Joey like to cuddle up together. Picture: Tim Hunter
Chrissy and Joey like to cuddle up together. Picture: Tim Hunter
Baby kangaroo joey Lily.
Baby kangaroo joey Lily.


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