ANGER turns to embarrassment after New Zealand shooting.
ANGER turns to embarrassment after New Zealand shooting. Christian Berechree

Anger turns to embarrassment after New Zealand shooting

YESTERDAY marked a week since New Zealand changed forever.

After hearing the terrorist was from Australia, I was angered to think someone who ripped that beautiful piece of the world apart that day came from our country.

My anger turned to embarrassment as I thought he was now known as Australian.

I questioned how someone who lived here, among us with every freedom a person could need, could have hate fester inside themselves until it spewed out in that way.

If his childhood was typical of a white kid in this country, I would assume he had no reason for any animosity towards people of the Islamic faith.

The physiological evaluation of this coward will be left to the experts, but I have an opinion on where his thinking started.

It has been under our nose for decades, and I would love to see it stop.

Our politicians seem to enjoy creating a culture of fear between immigrants and Australians, welfare cheats and hard-working Aussies.

Political debate in 2019 is simply us versus them.

Why do they do it?

They don't do this because there is no reward.

There is a prize for them at the end of it, and that is getting into power on the back of peoples' fears that were built up by telling us how bad things are.

The next prime minister of Australia will be decided in May, and in the lead up I am hopeful the leaders of all parties will be stopped when they are just stirring up fear.

I think we would live in a different country if Pauline Hanson was not given a voice when she said we were first being swamped by Asians, then Muslims.

Australia would be more accepting of refugees if John Howard was not in danger of losing the election in 2001, and he used desperate people on the Tampa as political pawns.

If only we were shown the plan to make Australia better, instead of how worried we should be, people would not be as fearful of other people as they are.

We can no longer accept the fear political leaders tell us, but we need to demand honest answers when we want to know where our nation is going.

And then we would live in not only a better country, but a more harmonious world.



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