Beach Holm resident Ray Thomson with his dog Inca on the banks of Black River who has survived two attacks from the same crocodile. Picture: Evan Morgan
Beach Holm resident Ray Thomson with his dog Inca on the banks of Black River who has survived two attacks from the same crocodile. Picture: Evan Morgan

Aggressive croc killed after attacking dogs

A CROCODILE has been euthanised in Black River, Beach Holm, after it was believed to have attacked a number of dogs.

The Department of Environment and science wildlife officers tried to capture the crocodile multiple times before it was deemed necessary to euthanise the animal.

Officers initially installed a baited trap to capture the crocodile, but it was unsuccessful.

Officers then attempted to direct capture the animal during high tides in early August, but the wary animal steered clear of the vessel.

After these unsuccessful attempts, wildlife officers determined due to the risk the animal posed to the community, the crocodile should be euthanised.

On August 10, wildlife officers humanely euthanised the animal.

In July, the Beach Holm residents told the Townsville Bulletin the aggressive croc had attacked at least four dogs.

Ray Thompson said his dog had its jugular ripped out.

"My dog was attacked in February, which was a $300 vet bill, and now it's another $670 this month," he said.

"It's my fault the dog got out and got bitten, but they do what dogs do.

"They get out and go for a run around.

"The crocodile likes to feed on wallabies and my dog likes chasing them, that's how he would have attacked it."

Wildlife officers described the crocodile removed as "small" and said there was another 3.5m croc at the mouth of Black River that had not been behaving aggressively and is not targeted for removal.

Under the Queensland Crocodile Management Plan, Black River is located within the Zone E, which means any crocodile displaying dangerous behaviours would be targeted for removal

 

Black River is known Croc Country and DES has reminded people to always be Crocwise.

- Expect crocodiles in ALL northern Queensland waterways, even if there is no warning sign

- Obey all warning signs - they are there to keep you safe

- Be aware crocs also swim in the ocean and be extra cautious around water at night

- Stay well away from croc traps - that includes fishing and boating

- The smaller the vessel the greater the risk, so avoid using canoes and kayaks

- Stand back from the water's edge when fishing and don't wade in to retrieve a lure

- Camp at least 50 metres from the edge of the water

- Never leave food, fish scraps or bait near the water, at camp sites or at boat ramps

- Never provoke, harass or feed crocs

- Always supervise children near the water and keep pets on a lead

- Remember, you are responsible for your own safety in Croc Country

- Report all croc sightings to DES by calling 1300 130 372.

 

 

Originally published as Aggressive croc killed after attacking dogs



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