NewsMail marketing manager Lisa Prowd promotes this year’s Adopt-a-Family Christmas Appeal.
NewsMail marketing manager Lisa Prowd promotes this year’s Adopt-a-Family Christmas Appeal. Max Fleet

Appeal to help Bundy battlers

BUNDABERG residents can play Santa this year by contributing to the annual Adopt-A-Family Christmas Appeal.

NewsMail marketing manager Lisa Prowd said the appeal, which began this week, assisted 69 families to have a better Christmas last year.

The families are chosen from an anonymous list of people identified by charities.

The NewsMail is again working closely with St Vincent de Paul, the Salvation Army, Centacare, Bundaberg Housing Services and the Baptist Church to identify needy families, who won’t be told they will be receiving hampers.

Mrs Prowd said advertisements would soon start appearing in the NewsMail giving basic details of the anonymous families, who would be assigned a number.

Families and individuals are encouraged to read the list and select a family they feel they could buy for.

“We had people ringing up last year crying and thanking us for the generous purchases,” Mrs Prowd said.

“It was all a big surprise. We were all in tears.”

She said all Bundaberg residents had to do was look for the advertisements, select a family and phone the corresponding charity.

The charity would then provide them with details, such as the age and interests of children, so that appropriate gifts could be purchased.

Mrs Prowd said former Broncos, Queensland and international rugby league legend Shane Webcke had been the ambassador for the appeal for the past four years.

She said Mr Webcke supported the appeal because he had had first-hand experience of the difficulty needy families faced at Christmas.



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