A report on the future of Australia's workforce found numerous local jobs have a moderate to high likelihood of being lost to technological advancements.
A report on the future of Australia's workforce found numerous local jobs have a moderate to high likelihood of being lost to technological advancements.

50% of jobs at risk in robot revolution

SCIENCE fiction could soon become a reality on the Fraser Coast, with more than 50% of jobs under threat from technology in the next 10-15 years.

A report on the future of Australia's workforce found numerous local jobs have a moderate to high likelihood of being lost to technological advancements.

THE Committee for Economic Development of Australia report predicts a high probability technology could replace more than five million Australian jobs within the next 10 to 15 years.

Are you afraid your job is at risk from automated workforce?

This poll ended on 17 September 2015.

Current Results

Yes, I am afraid my job is at risk

31%

No, I'm not afraid

40%

I am in an industry that shouldn't be affected

27%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

Fraser Coast Regional Council Mayor Gerard O'Connell said automation was occurring at a rapid rate and the council was working to push the region into the digital age.

"To stand still is not an option," he said.

EXPERTS SAY: 

- Miners, manufacturing, hospitality and retail workers are at risk from automated workforce

- Mayor says Fraser Coast is primed to benefit as 'tech hub' with council pushing region into the digital age

Widespread computerisation of normal human jobs is expected to expand competition through reducing consumer costs and worker incomes.

Another part of what has been dubbed the new industrial revolution is globalisation, where workers across the world use technology to perform jobs in remote locations.

Cr O'Connell hopes the region's idyllic location can draw workers in occupations that fall into this category, such as those in telecommunication and information technology.

RELATED: How the Australian workforce is going to change by 2030

The Local Government Association of Queensland is already looking at leasing out drones as low-cost tools to councils to monitor landfill sites and roads, and gauge weather disaster damage.

A new report from the Foundation for Young Australians found more than 90% of the current workforce would need digital skills to perform their roles in the next two to five years.

CEDA chief Stephen Martin believes innovation and reskilling mature age workers are vital to addressing the rapidly changing employment scene.

He suggested a Danish scheme where people were trained in professions the economy needed instead of participating in work-for-the-dole projects.

But Professor Martin said new jobs and industries would emerge if Australia planned and invested in the right areas.

Although the Federal Government has allocated $190 million over four years to drive workplace innovation, Prof Martin said more money was needed.

- APN NEWSDESK



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