5 times monster snakes got scarily too close to residents

IT'S snake season, technically.

But in Gladstone, especially in rural areas, there never seems to be a set season for snakes because they always seem to be everywhere.

Lately reports on social media are revealing that more and more pets are being attacked and stalked by these creatures.

They are showing up in pool filter boxes, underneath toilet seats, slithering around in our sheds or even caught in the act trying to make a meal of our beloved pets.

So, to remind residents just how sneaky snakes can be, we've compiled a list of times Gladstone region residents had a scary encounter with one.

1. Monster python makes a meal of king parrot

This would have to be by far the most memorable encounter a Gladstone region resident has had with a snake, or monster snake.

The moment a carpet python swallowed a wild king parrot at an Agnes Water home. Contributed.
The moment a carpet python swallowed a wild king parrot at an Agnes Water home. Contributed.

Bianca said she had only just woken up when she looked out the window and saw the snake 'enjoying a large breakfast.'

While the snake was eating, Bianca was able to get up close and personal with the snake.

"It didn't even see us standing around," she said.

"It was in some sort of food coma and it's one and only goal was to digest the parrot. Once it had finished, we relocated the snake to the bush a few kilometres from our home."

Bianca sent the photos to Sunshine Coast snake catcher Stuart McKenzie, who has many followers from all over Queensland and deals with pythons on a day to day basis.

Stuart said while pythons are very common in the Sunshine Coast, they're also very common in the Gladstone region. "They can be found almost anywhere," he said.

"I've been called to jobs and found them on roofs, like this one, in gardens, in trees … they don't really have a preference."

While carpet pythons aren't venomous, they use their bodies as their weapons to suffocate and kill their prey.

2. Small pooch's close-to-death encounter with python

IT SEEMS a rational thought to be more scared of a venomous snake rather than a non-venomous one.

But the sheer strength of a carpet python came too close to crushing Agnes Water woman Leanne Cassell's shih Tzu cross Maltese, Chia.

Leanne Cassell found her eight-month-old dog Chia trapped by a python in their backyard.
Leanne Cassell found her eight-month-old dog Chia trapped by a python in their backyard.

But then Leanne heard a terrifying squeal that shook her to the core.

The day before she and her husband Paul spotted a snake in their Agnes Water backyard, and said they would not let Chia outside at night.

But Chia's curiosity got the better of her, chasing after a toad in their garden.

Leanne Cassell found her eight-month-old dog Chia trapped by a python in their backyard.
Leanne Cassell found her eight-month-old dog Chia trapped by a python in their backyard.

"She started squealing her head off," Mrs Cassell said.

"I just started screaming, I knew what happened.

"It was wrapped around her twice, there was no way she could move," she said.

"It was trying to crush her."

Luckily Mrs Cassell's husband Paul ran outside and managed to distract the snake with a stick.

"The snake loosened its grip and Chia was able to get out," she said.

After the incident they inspected their pooch and found she had six marks where the snake had bitten her.

While the lucky pooch is now back to her energetic self, it was a wake up call to Leanne, who said you don;t need to live in the bushland to fall victim to a snake.

3. Man finds coastal taipan in home

A TANNUM Sands man got the fright of his life when he found a snake at his home.

But not just any snake, one of the world most venomous and deadly snakes, and it was in his garage.

Kris Foster holding the coastal taipan found at a Tannum Sands man's house.
Kris Foster holding the coastal taipan found at a Tannum Sands man's house. Paul Braven

"I got a call … about a dark-coloured snake in a house," Mr Foster said.

"When I went there the bloke showed me where the snake was last seen."

Mr Foster said coastal taipan bites had "a lot of different effects".

He said the effects included nausea, a dry mouth, blurred vision and loss of consciousness.

Mr Foster said, if bitten, people should call an ambulance and put a compression band on the area immediately.

4. Big python had big plans for dinner

CAUGHT in the coils of a three-metre-long carpet python, this (at the time) four-month-old kitten was lucky to survive.

SNAKE ATTACK: Aleesha Harris, 18, saved her kitten Jade from a three metre python. Contributed.
SNAKE ATTACK: Aleesha Harris, 18, saved her kitten Jade from a three metre python. Contributed. Declan Cooley

Beverly Hodge let her two new kittens, Jade and Jasper, out to play at their property in Agnes Water when the python lunged out from under their house and ensnared Jade in its grip.

Beverly said until that moment she hadn't heard her kitten meow once, but struggling to survive "she learnt really quickly".

"My daughter let out a scream and tried to tackle the snake with her bare hands," she said.

"The dogs started barking and the other kitten was trying to bite the snake.

"Then I told my daughter Aleesha to put the hose on the snake because they don't like water but I'd written it off," she said.

After an "intense" 15 minutes and with the help of a rake Aleesha was able to free Jade who escaped with only a slight kink in its tail.

And that wasn't the first time Beverly, nor her cats, had been confronted by some big beasts.

Two years ago her cat Jack was attacked by another python which wrapped itself around the cat and almost choked the life out of it.

"I just heard a bit of thump and got there in time to see the python wrapping itself around the cat," she said.

"We were hitting the snake on the head and when it let go the cat had no heartbeat until the vet revived it.

"Since then Jack hasn't had any trouble but he's got a problem with his nerves. He's very jumpy," she said.

But she says the cats are all doing well and back to playing outside.

5. Expert ensures snake under bed tale ends well

IN 2014 Gladstone resident Amelia Beezley saw a slithering brown tail slide under her daughter's bed.

"Something moved in the corner of my eye, and I freaked out," she told The Observer in october 2014.

She shut the door and called her husband Ben, who put a towel under the door and called snake catcher Joey Drumm.

"I always come prepared for a brown, but this one turned out to be a harmless dark-green tree snake," said Mr Drumm.

An eastern brown snake.Photo Contributed
An eastern brown snake.Photo Contributed Contributed

And if you weren't creeped out by these snake occurences, check out this gallery of snakes found in weird places:



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