Lifestyle

Why eating everything that's on your plate can be bad for you

QUEENSLANDERS are being urged to portion their plates and stay mindful of meal sizes for optimum health, with new research revealing many Wide Bay Burnett locals are prone to overeating.

Even when full, more than two in five Queenslanders always or mostly finish everything on their plate, increasing risks of overweight and obesity.

Cancer Council Queensland spokesperson Katie Clift said being mindful of portion sizes would boost the overall health and happiness of Queenslanders.

"Over time our meal sizes have increased significantly, without a corresponding increase in physical activity to offset extra calories," Ms Clift said.

"It's time to put proportion back in portion sizes. By being mindful of meal sizes, Queenslanders can avoid overeating and feeling uncomfortably full, to achieve a healthy weight.

"The weight of a person's plate goes to their waistline.

"Eating a healthy, balanced diet, and sticking to recommended portion sizes can improve long-term health and wellbeing, reducing risks of illness and chronic disease."

Cancer Council recommends all Queenslanders build awareness of nutrition and physical activity for a healthy life.

"A healthy plate is key to a healthy diet," Ms Clift said.

"As a general rule, salads and vegetables should make up the biggest proportion of your plate - aim for at least five serves of vegetables every day," Ms Clift said.

"Aim to fill about a quarter of your plate with carbohydrate-based foods like wholegrain bread, a medium sized potato, quinoa, rice or polenta.

"The final quarter of your plate should be a source of protein - think cooked lean meats, poultry, fish or eggs, lentils, chickpeas and nuts."

Queenslanders can improve their chances of a cancer free future by enjoying a healthy, balanced diet and maintaining a healthy weight.

Queenslanders are invited to join the QUEST to reduce portion sizes and eat healthier diets at Cancer Council Queensland's quest.org.au - an online program to help Queenslanders make the healthy choice the easy choice.

More information about Cancer Council Queensland is available via 13 11 20 or cancerqld.org.au.

Topics:  cancer council, diet, food, obesity, weight loss




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