Feature

The top 4 hidden gems for Queensland off-road adventurers

Careful: Some of these tracks are for hard-core offroaders only
Careful: Some of these tracks are for hard-core offroaders only

1. Big Red Track, Glasshouse Mountains

A 4WD track for the very experienced and with a very well set up 4x4. If it's been raining, the clay soil makes it even more of a challenge, but it's arguably the most coveted of achievements for Sunshine Coast off-roaders.

How to get there: Go to the Glasshouse Mountains lookout point, follow the road ahead and turn right at the next T-junction. About one kilometre further on you'll find Big Red and its little brother, Little Red. If you see motocross riders off-loading here, you know you're in the right spot.

Why it's great: Visit YouTube.com and you'll see what you're in for - there are numerous video posts made by 4WDers showing quite how tough ol' Big Red is.

Tips: Have a good back up team and a decent recovery vehicle and rescue gear.

Watch out for: Experts say be prepared to break something, a roll cage for your 4x4 is a good idea and don't even think about trying this one unless you're experienced.

2. The Diggings, Crediton State Forest

How to get there: Drive west about 70km to Eungella. Turn right at the signposted gravel road a few kilometres from Eungella township heading towards Broken River. A camping ground at Broken River is about 5km in.

Why it's great: It's a historical area where gold mines once operated and there is a maze of tracks once you're across the river.

Tips: It's an area for high-clearance 4WD vehicles only with low ratio transfer. Don't bring mum's 'town' 4WD here.

Watch out for: Sections are very steep and tracks are often eroded so there is a need for extreme care.

3. Burrum Coast National Park

Burrum Coast National Park is spread over four sections - Kinkuna, Woodgate, Burrum River and Buxton.

How to get there: The Kinkuna section is about 14km south of Bundaberg and is accessed via Palm Beach Road. It has campsites on the foreshore and is a popular destination.

Further south is the Woodgate section of the park which can be reached from Childers or Bundaberg via Woodgate Rd. It has a wheelchair-accessible track to a viewing platform with a picnic table and fishing platform.

Access to the Burrum River section is via the Bruce Hwy-exit at Torbanlea or Howard and tracks run along the banks of the Burrum River.

Buxton is accessible via Bruce Hwy-exit at Buxton Rd and travel 13km to Pioneer Rd.

Why it's great: What makes this entire park ideal for a retreat are the flowering heaths, quiet beaches and abundant wildlife.

Tips: With views along the river it makes for a pleasant spot to take a break, but remember to bring insect repellent.

Watch out for: Bird watchers and nature photographers.

4. Devil's Elbow - Beecher State Forest

Consider the title of this four-wheel-drive track before committing to the adventure.

How to get there:  Head west on the Dawson Highway towards Calliope.

Take a left onto Wyndham Road, continue until the T-intersection and make a left turn onto Schulze Road. At the top of the hill, you will find the entrance to the track.

Why it's great: Two hours through to a full day of activities: Beecher State Forest has a lot to offer, and is close enough to tackle them all in one day, or to revisit several times.

Tips: In wet weather, the track becomes a real slop. If you are into wet conditions, Beecher may be one of the best local opportunities.

Watch out for:  The Devil's Elbow is often underestimated for its difficulty.

30 inch suspension lift clearance is recommended for some of the hairier options, with many local four wheel drive enthusiasts claiming close calls.

If rock, mud and dirt are your favourite types of terrain, take on the Devil's Elbow.

Topics:  4wd, outdoor-living




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