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Technology could stop a quarter of heavy vehicle crashes

THE RACQ is calling for the heavy vehicle industry to install life-saving technology in trucks in a bid to reduce the number of serious crashes.

New research, conducted by Monash University Accident Research Centre, found Autonomous Emergency Braking Technology could reduce the number of heavy vehicle crashes by up to 25 percent.

RACQ executive manager Technical and Safety Policy Steve Spalding said more than 18 percent of Queensland road fatalities last year involved heavy freight vehicles.

"Heavy vehicle fatalities are over-represented and we need to do all we can to reduce the number of serious crashes," Mr Spalding said.

"A lot of research in the past has investigated the benefits of fitting crash avoidance technology to light vehicles, but this is the first time we've seen evidence of its effects in heavy vehicles."

Mr Spalding said there was also evidence to support the introduction of other crash avoidance technology.

"Lane departure warning systems, electronic stability control and fatigue warning systems were also examined and found to prevent as much as six percent of heavy vehicle fatalities nationwide," he said.

Mr Spalding said with the increase in heavy vehicle registrations across Australia expected, now was the time to act.

"We are only going to be seeing more heavy vehicles on our roads in the future which risks even more serious or fatal crashes," he said.

"Truck drivers are working under intense deadlines and are often driving long distances on roads that aren't always in the best condition.

"By choosing vehicles with the latest safety technology, the industry can help make their jobs safer."

 

Topics:  racq, traffic crashes




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