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Crew sails in wake of Titanic

Maryborough’s Jocelyn Watts and Debbie Foale get ready to take Titanic cruise with Damian Foale and Don Watts.
Maryborough’s Jocelyn Watts and Debbie Foale get ready to take Titanic cruise with Damian Foale and Don Watts. Megan Pope

WHEN the RMS Titanic sank as it crossed the Atlantic Ocean 100 years ago, the ship that was meant to be unsinkable became famous as one of the biggest maritime disasters on record.

Maryborough's Debbie Foale and her husband Damian will walk in the tragic footsteps of those 1523 passengers who lost their lives aboard the ship when they board the Titanic Memorial Cruise next month.

On April 15, the same date the Titanic sank, at 2.20 in the morning, when the stern went under descending to its final resting place at the bottom of the sea, the Foales will attend a memorial ceremony on board the ship above the very spot where the Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg.

The two discovered the cruise when Debbie was browsing the internet.

She noticed a link advertising the Titanic Memorial Cruise and knew straight away it was something she really wanted to do.

Debbie and Damian love taking unusual holidays and Debbie has always been fascinated by the tragic tale of Titanic, so it was right up their alley.

"We pretty much decided straight away," Debbie said.

Soon after the couple were in touch with their friends Jocelyn and Don Watts, who are also from Maryborough, and they decided to go along as well.

"It's an once-in-a-lifetime thing."

Debbie says it will feel "a little surreal" to be over the spot that was the scene of so much tragedy 100 years ago.

She said some people might see it as a little ghoulish but it was really about paying homage to those who had died and those who had managed to survive the tragedy.

The sinking of the Titanic led to significant changes to maritime law, which also fascinated Debbie.

During the cruise, there will be opportunities for guests to dress up in period costumes and really walk in the footsteps of those who made the journey before them.

Food will be served from the era and the music passengers aboard Titanic 100 years ago would have listened to will be played.

There will also be descendents on board the cruise ship who had family members who died in the tragedy or who managed to survive one of our worst maritime disasters..

At the end of the cruise, the ship will dock in New York - the final destination the Titanic was never able to reach.

"That's going to be really exciting."

Topics:  new york, sailing, titanic




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