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Boot campers discover used syringe at beach

WATCH YOUR STEP: Dave Quaile and Mat Templeman are concerned for the safety of beach users after they found a used syringe on their regular Sunday morning boot camp training session. Photo: Selina Ferrais / NewsMail
WATCH YOUR STEP: Dave Quaile and Mat Templeman are concerned for the safety of beach users after they found a used syringe on their regular Sunday morning boot camp training session. Photo: Selina Ferrais / NewsMail Selina Ferrais BUN250214KEL1

A BOOT camp leader has condemned the actions of the "low-life" who left a used syringe on Kelly's Beach that came dangerously close to putting the health of his participants at risk.

The discovery of the used syringe was made during one of Dave Quaile's free Sunday morning boot camp sessions at the beach at the weekend.

"What sort of low-life is going to shoot up on the beach and leave their filthy, used needles on the beach where people can come into contact with it?" Mr Quaile said.

What further fuelled the group's anger and shock was that there was a sharps disposal container located in toilets near where the group was training.

"What sort of animals are they?" Mr Quaile said.

"It's bad enough being a junkie in the beginning, but to have no regard for the public, I can't understand it."

Mr Quaile said the incident left the group of exercise enthusiasts scared and shocked.

"Everyone got angry with it because you've got kids in that area who play in the sand," he said.

"People are there walking, us training, and kids who just come to play in the sand."

Trish Johnson was at the group session said she was appalled that her own health, and that of those around her, was put at risk.

"They should think of everyone else's health - they need to be more responsible," she said.

Sadly, needle stick injuries can happen in places such as parks, playgrounds, laneways and public toilets.

What follows is a period of anxiety and distress while the victim waits - sometimes for months - for test results to come back.

Health experts say this is quite a natural response when thoughts of potential infection with blood borne viruses such as HIV, hepatitis B and C occur.

Should someone come into contact with a needle, it is advised to immediately wash the area around the puncture for at least 30 seconds, using soap and warm water.

Cover the site with a bandaid or similar dressing and seek medical advice

The most important tip is not to panic - the risk of catching a serious infection is very low as these viruses do not survive for long outside of the body.

Topics:  boot camp, editors picks, syringe




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