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Are Emojis taking over from English? :-)

ENGLISH is no longer the universal messaging language, according to a new study from smartphone maker, OPPO Australia.

The research, which was released today, reveals that more than half of Queenslanders (59%) believe that Emoji has now become the universal language for messages.

Emojis have skyrocketed in popularity in recent years, helped by the rise in smartphone usage and inclusion within major messaging platforms.

Emojis have been warmly embraced by the public, with one in six (17%) Queenslanders claiming that Emoji should be recognised as its own official language.

Michael Tran, CMO at OPPO Australia said: "These findings may come as a surprise to some, but when you take a step back, it's easy to see why Emojis are so popular.

"A limitation of traditional text based communication is the inability to accurately express feelings and tone within messages. Emojis help to overcome this, allowing users to communicate complex emotions and ideas within static messages.

"Emojis add character and personality to messages. Our customers love using them and that's why we've fully embraced Emojis across all our devices."

This is supported by the study which also found that over two thirds (67%) of female and half (52%) of male Australians feel that using Emojis in messages allows them to express themselves better.

The research confirms that Emojis are far from a temporary cultural fad, and are here to stay in a big way.

Topics:  emoji, internet, offbeat




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